Monday, July 31, 2017

Daily Health Tips & Trivia # 5:

Garlic and onion are alternative medicine to dissolve gallstones!
Daily Health Tips & Trivia # 5:
Garlic and onion are alternative medicine to dissolve gallstones!

Sunday, July 30, 2017

Saturday, July 29, 2017

Daily Health Tips & Trivia # 3:

Your cellphone is 10 times dirtier than your toilet seat!
Daily Health Tips & Trivia # 3:
Your cellphone is 10 times dirtier than your toilet seat!

Friday, July 28, 2017

Daily Health Tips & Trivia # 2:

Virgin coconut oil, castor oil, & olive oil can be used as eye drop to relieve dry eye syndrome. It often works better than conventional eye drop for the long-term relief of dry eyes.
Daily Health Tips & Trivia # 2:
Virgin coconut oil, castor oil, & olive oil can be used as eye drop to relieve dry eye syndrome. It often works better than conventional eye drop for the long-term relief of dry eyes.

Thursday, July 27, 2017

Daily Health Tips & Trivia # 1:

WHY LAUGHTER IS "THE BEST MEDICINE?
Daily Health Tips & Trivia # 1:
WHY LAUGHTER IS "THE BEST MEDICINE?"
Triggers release of natural pain-killers "endorphins"
Boost immunity
Lowers blood pressure
Lowers stress hormones
Improves emotional health
Uplifts the mood
Strengthens bond

Wednesday, July 26, 2017

11 Milk Trivia & Fun Facts

11 Milk Trivia & Fun Facts

By: Arlene Gentallan

11 Milk Trivia & Fun Facts
11 Milk Trivia & Fun Facts

Fun facts and trivia about milk. Know this before drinking your Milk

1. Did you know that milk is high in saturated fats which can increase your risk of developing coronary vascular disease like atherosclerosis, heart attack, and stroke. Choose a low fat milk.

2. Research has found an association between drinking milk and developing ovarian cancer / prostate cancer.

3. While milk is a good source of calcium, drinking 3 glass of milk is not enough, you need to also exercise to keep calcium in your bones.

4. Countries where milk consumption is high tend to have higher rates of fracture and osteoporosis compared to countries with less dairy consumption.

5. Dairy products like milk stimulates stomach acid secretion because of it's high fat content. This aggravates heartburn / gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

6. Mammals only drink milk when they are babies, except humans.

7. You need vitamin D in order to absorb calcium from your diet.

8. One glass of milk provides about 300mg of calcium, but humans can only absorb about 100mg.

9. Did you know that about 99% of your body's total calcium is stored in your bones and teeth?

10. While dairy products like milk is a good source of calcium, you can also get this mineral from vegetables like kale, broccoli, and Chinese cabbage.

11. Our major source of milk comes from cows.



Which can give more Calcium: Cow's milk vs Spinach

Which can give more Calcium: Cow's milk vs Spinach

By: Arlene Gentallan

Which can give more Calcium: Cow's milk vs Spinach
Which can give more Calcium: Cow's milk vs Spinach

        Where can you get more calcium? Is it from cow's milk or from spinach?

 Calcium absorption: Cow's milk vs. Spinach

        One serving of milk (1 glass) contains about 300mg calcium. On the other hand, one serving of cooked spinach (half a cup) contains about 115mg of calcium.

        But, the human body can not absorb all their calcium content. We can
absorb about 32% of cow's milk calcium content, while only 5% from spinach. So, our body can absorb about 100mg calcium from 1 serving of milk while only 6mg per serving of spinach.


Why?

        Although spinach contains more calcium than most vegetables, human absorb less calcium because of it's high oxylate content. That means in order to get the same amount of calcium from 1 glass of milk, you'll need to eat about 8 cups of cooked spinach.


Sunday, July 16, 2017

Alcohol intake during Pregnancy alters a Baby's facial feature

Alcohol intake during Pregnancy alters a Baby's facial feature

By: Arlene Gentallan

Alcohol intake during Pregnancy alters a Baby's facial feature
Alcohol intake during Pregnancy alters a Baby's facial feature

        Alcohol intake in excess during pregnancy can have delirious effects to the unborn child. Even small intake of alcohol does have a price.

        Pregnant women who drink even the slightest amount of alcohol at any point during pregnancy can consequently lead to minor defects on their baby's facial feature. Further studies are still needed to see if small intake of alcohol consumed during pregnancy has a negative effect to a child's mental development.

        According to the researchers "For women who are, or may become pregnant, avoiding alcohol is the safest option."

        A 3 year study involving 415 children found through 3-dimensional craniofacial analysis anomalies in facial feature of children whose mother drunk alcohol during pregnancy. Facial anomalies were not readily visible to the naked eye. Anomalies could be seen on the forehead, midface, eyes, nose, or chin. Some facial defects seen are upward displacement of the nose, and depression of the midface.

        3D craniofacial analysis was done during a child's first year of life.

        Facial defects of the forehead were observed among children whose mother have low exposure to alcohol during the first trimester of pregnancy.

        Facial defects seen on the eyes, chin, midface and parietal region were observed in children whose mother have moderate (1 drink per day) to heavy (8 or more drinks per week) intake of alcohol during the first trimester of pregnancy.

        Facial defect seen on the chin was observed in children whose mother binge drink (4 or more drinks on a single occasion) on alcohol during the first trimester of pregnancy.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), "There is no known safe level of alcohol use during pregnancy. Women who are pregnant or plan on becoming pregnant should refrain from drinking alcohol."

Resources:

Muggli, E., Matthews, H., et al. (2017). Association Between Prenatal Alcohol Exposure and Craniofacial Shape of Children at 12 Months of Age. JAMA Paediatrics. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2017.0778

https://www.cdc.gov/alcohol/faqs.htm#bingeDrinking