Thursday, June 30, 2016

How much nail polish remover can kill you?

How much nail polish remover can kill you?

By: Arlene Gentallan

Ingesting 128ml of nail polish can kill you. For young children, ingesting a dose lower than this can still be lethal.

Nail polish remover contains acetone, a carcinogic substance that has a number of potential health hazards to living organisms like humans and animals.

Don't ingest acetone, it's poisonous! If you are in the United States, dial 1-800-222-1222 to speak with a local poison control center.





How much acetone is in nail polish remover?

How much acetone is in nail polish remover? 

Nail polish remover usually have 60% acetone content. 





How much acetone can kill you?


How much acetone can kill you?

By: Arlene Gentallan

Ingesting about 80ml pure acetone is lethal to human, however a lower dose of acetone can be lethal to younger children.



Here's an excerpt from the toxicology profile for acetone by the U.S Department of Health and Human Services:

"One of two rabbits given 7,844 mg/kg acetone by gavage died within 19 hours of dosing, two rabbits given 5,491 mglkg survived, while one rabbit given 3,922 mg/kg died in 96 hours (Walton et al. 1928). Oral doses of 7,500 or 8,000 mg/kg acetone were fatal to two puppies (Albertoni 1884)."





Acetone Health Hazard

Acetone Health Hazard

By: Arlene Gentallan

Acetone is a colorless flammable solvent, with sweet mint-like smell, widely commercialized, but poses danger to people's health.


Acetone is also known as:
  • 2-Propanone
  • Dimethyl carbonyl
  • Dimethylformaldehyde
  • Dimethyl ketone
  • Methyl Ketone
  • Propanonene
  • Pyroacetic Acid

Acetone can be found in cigarettes, nail polish remover, pain, adhesives, plastic, varnish, wax, and photographic film. It can be use to clean glasswares and wipe clean permanent ink market.

Acetone is a carcinogen, it's one among the many ingredients of cigarette that's poses serious health hazard.

Inhaling acetone can result to:

  • Eye irritation
  • Nose irritation
  • Throat irritation
  • Difficulty of breathing
  • Headache
  • Dizziness
  • Lightheadedness
  • Nausea & Vomiting


Skin exposure can result in irritation and redness of the area.

Using nail polish remover often can result in dry brittle nails that easily cracks.

In high doses, acetone is lethal:

  • Respiratory distress
  • Kidney failure
  • Liver damage
  • Seizure
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Coma
  • Death


Don't ingest acetone, it's poisonous! If you are in the United States, dial 1-800-222-1222 to speak with a local poison control center.





Wednesday, June 29, 2016

Can Ginkgo Biloba Extract be used for anticancer?

Can Ginkgo Biloba Extract be used for anticancer?

by: Arlene Gentallan


        Ginkgo Biloba is one of the most popular and best-selling herbal dietary supplement in the United States. Surely, there must be an amazing reason for it's reputation. Several mention has been made about ginkgo biloba's reputed anti-cancer property.

        It's anticancer property may be attributed to it's antioxidant capability owing to it's terpenoids,  flavanoids, and flavone glycosides content. It is also antifungal,  antibacterial, antithrombotic, memory enhancer, and circulatory stimulant.

        In a study by Bai Y, Ahao F, Li Y, et al. of China published on NLM, they've found out that ginkgo biloba extract (EGb 761) inhibit gastric cancer proliferation by inducing natural cancer cell death.

        But in another study by Mary Biggs, PhD, MPH, Barbara Sorkin, PhD, et al, their result "do not support the hypothesis that consumption of Ginkgo biloba reduces the risk of cancer." For the study, they had 3,069 participant with age 75 years old above. One group received 120mg ginkgo biloba extract (EGb 761) while the other group received placebo. Among those receiving ginkgo biloba extract, they've noticed a 2-fold increase in the occurrence of breast cancer and colorectal cancer. They did however, noticed lower occurrence of prostate cancer. Several limitations of the study were cited like the 120 mg twice daily dosing of ginkgo biloba not being optimal for cancer prevention.

        It is also worth knowing that herbal supplement quality of ginkgo biloba extract may vary from manufacturer because of the varying methods used to make them. Herbal supplements have no approved therapeutic claim so it will be best to seek medical advice from your doctor should you consider it as an adjunct to cancer treatment.

Conclusion: Although Ginkgo biloba has shows anticancer potential, it's use as an anti-cancer treatment needs further clinical research. There is no solid research proof that can be used to recommend ginkgo biloba to treat cancer.

Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Home Remedies for Cough

Home Remedies for Cough
by: Arlene Gentallan

        Cough serves a vital role of protecting our respiratory system, ironically excessive coughing is one of the most common health problems. It can be a source of annoyance especially when it interferes with daily activities and sleep. There are alternative kitchen remedies that can work wonders for you.


What is cough?
        Cough is the involuntary reflex resulting to sudden expulsion of air from the lungs. It's the body's natural mechanism to clear the airways.


What is the purpose of cough?
  • It may be protective in nature such as to help you clear your airways when you aspirate a foreign body or inhale an irritating substance.
  • It can also be caused by an underlying disease such as an common cold, infection, GERD, or tumor.

Cough can be caused by an underlying health problem which needs to be solve.

What are the types of cough?
  • Acute cough has a duration of less than 3 weeks
  • Subacute cough has a duration of 3 - 8 weeks
  • Chronic cough has a duration of more than 8 weeks
  • Productive cough - when you cough up secretions such as mucus, sputum or phlegm
  • Dry cough - when your cough does not procude secretions


Causes of Cough
Cough lasting less than 3 weeks are often caused by:
  • URTI (upper respiratory tract infection) such as common cold, influenza (flu), and pneumonia
  • Inhaling irritating substance such as smoke, dust and pollen

Cough lasting more than 8 weeks (chronic cough) has three most common causes:
  • Postnasal drip syndrome (PNDS)
  • Asthma
  • Acid reflux

But causes of cough isn't just limited to those mention above, there may be wide range of culprit such as:
  • Sinusitis
  • Pharyngitis
  • Laryngitis
  • Bronchitis
  • Epiglottitis
  • Croup
  • Tonsillitis
  • Allergic rhinitis (hay fever)
  • Smoking
  • Exposure to allergen
  • GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease), choking
  • Side effect of medication such as ACE inhibitors
  • Tuberculosis
  • Tumor
  • Lung cancer
  • Congestive heart failure
  • Whooping cough



What are the alternative remedies for cough?

HOME REMEDIES FOR COUGH


1. Honey

        More than just a sweetener, honey acts as a demulcent or a substance that forms a protective coating on the mucous membrane of your mouth to ease pain, inflammation, and irritation cause by cough.

The World Health Organization (WHO) pinpoint honey as a demulcent.

        Honey's use as a home remedy for cough is convenient and relatively safe considering it's worldwide consumption and availability.
        It can also be taken by children above one year old. It's efficacy in children is valuable considering how cough suppressant medications often cause untoward side effects in the younger population.
        A study by Evan Ashkin, MD and Anne Mounsey, MD publised on NLM, shows that honey reduces cough frequency and severity. They offer the following  recommendation:
"For children older than one year with a viral URI, we can now recommend 1.5 tsp honey to be given prior to bedtime as a cough remedy. This may reduce the use of potentially harmful and often ineffective OTC cough and cold remedies."
Note: Honey is not recommended for children less than 1 year old because of the risk of develping botulism.
        Also, a study by Shadkam, Mozaffari-Khosravi and Mozayan published on NML concluded that honey is more effective in relieving cough caused by upper respiratory infection (URI) than cough suppresants dextromethorphan (DM) and diphenhydramine (DPH):
"receiving a 2.5-mL dose of honey before sleep has a more alleviating effect on URIs-induced cough compared with DM and DPH doses."

Do it yourself Cough Remedies with honey and lemon:
        Ingredients:
  • 1 cup or 8 ounce warm water
  • 1 piece fresh lemon
  • 2 teaspoon honey
  • juicer

        Instruction
  1. To obtain more juice from a lemon, soak it in warm water for about 15 minutes before you juice it.
  2. Pour 1 cup or 8 ounce warm water in a mug
  3. Cut a lemon in half
  4. Use a juicer to juice the lemon, strain it and our it to the mug
  5. Add 2 tsp honey
  6. Stir and Enjoy!

Note: Lemon is a good source of vitamin C.


2. Licorice root

        Licorice is a herb used since ancient times as a sweet flavoring and alternative medicine. It has been used in many parts of the world like ancient Egypt (where it was found in the tomb of King Tut), China, India, Rome, Greece and others. 
        Licorice root is a demulcent and an expectorant. It relives the throat of irritation and pain and ease the removal of sticky secretions from the lungs. It is also used to relieve common cold, sore throat, canker sore, bronchitis, GERD, viral infection, skin disorder, and irritable bowel syndrome.
        Did you know that research indicates that licorice root contains "glycyrrhizic acid," an potent antiviral and anti-tumor compound. It has also been shown to inhibit hepatitis C virus replication, and has been used for kaposi's sarcoma.

How to make Licorice root tea?
        Ingredients:
  • 1 cup or 8 ounce water
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried licorice root

        Instruction
  1. Boil 1/2 tsp dried licorice root in 1 cup of water for 5 minutes
  2. Steep for another 5-15 minutes
  3. No need to add sugar. Licorice has a natural sweet taste
  4. Strain and serve!
There's also available readily made licorice tea bags for purchase.

Caution: Using licorice root has the potential to increase your blood pressure.


3. Gargle with salt and water

        Gargling with salt and water soothes your throat by reducing throat inflammation and swelling bough about by excessive coughing. It also ease the removal of phlegm has anti-bacterial property.
        Simply add 1 teaspoon salt to a cup (250 ml) of warm water. Gargle for about 30 seconds.

4. Thyme

        Thyme contains "terpenoids" which acts as an expectorant. It is relieves smooth muscle spasm seen in cough. Studies has shown that thyme in combination of ivy leaves suggests that it can help relieve productive cough secondary to upper respiratory infections like cold and bronchitis.

How to make thyme tea?
        Ingredients:
  • 1 cup or 8 ounce boiling water
  • 1 tablespoon dried thyme leaves or 2 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves
  • 1 teaspoon honey

        Instructions:
  1. Pour 1 cup boiling water in a mug
  2. Add 1 tbsp dried or 2 tbsp fresh thyme leaves
  3. Steep for 10 minutes
  4. Add 1 teaspoon honey
  5. Serve!
Don't forget to hydrate yourself with plenty of fluids!


5. Oregano

        Oregano is an effective alternative medicine to treat cough, common cold, asthma, bronchitis, nasal congestion, sinusitis, and sore throat. Oregano has antibacterial, anti-fungal, and anti-inflammatory properties.

There are several ways you can harness the benefits of oregano:
  • Ingest 1 tablespoon concentrated oregano juice every hour to relieve your cough.
  • Ingest 1 to 2 drops oregano oil 3 times a day
  • Take oregano tea 3 times a day


How to make an oregano tea deconcoction?
        Ingredients:
  • 2 tablespoon fresh oregano leaves or 1 tablespoon dried oregano leaves
  • 1 cup (250 ml) boiling water
  • 1 teaspoon honey

        Instructions:
  1. Pour 1 cup boiling water in a mug
  2. Add 2 tbsp fresh or 1 tbsp dried oregano leaves
  3. Steep for 5-10 minutes
  4. Add 1 teaspoon honey
  5. Serve!
  6. Take this deconcoction 3 times a day.

6. Peppermint

        Peppermint contains menthol which works to relieve congestion and irritation caused by cough and colds. There are several ways you can benefit from peppermint's soothing effect:
  • Put several drops of peppermint essential oil into a cotton to inhale it
  • Add a few drops of peppermint essential oil to boiling water and breath it's vapour
  • Make yourself a cup of peppermint tea


How to make Peppermint tea?
        Ingredients:
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 tablespoon dried or fresh peppermint leaves
  • 1 teaspoon honey or lime

       Instruction:
  1. Put 1 cup boiling water in a mug
  2. Add 1 tbsp dried or fresh peppermint leaves
  3. Cover mug with saucer and steep for 5-10 minutes
  4. You may add a teaspoon of honey or lime for flavor
  5. Strain, cool, sip and enjoy

7. Ginger

        Ginger contains "oleoresi" which has antitussive property which helps supress cough. It also contains "zingibain"  which is anti-inflammatory. It has been used since the ancient times to treat coug, common cold, flu, dizziness, headache, nauea and vomiting.
To relieve your throat from colds, cough, and flu, you can chew 1 small piece raw ginger, drink ginger ale or ginger tea.
How to Make a Ginger Tea? 
        Ingredients:
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 inch size ginger or 1 teaspoon ginger powder
  • 1 teaspoon honey or lime

       Instruction:
  1. Boil 1 cup of water
  2. Peel and finely chop a 1 inch size ginger
  3. You may also use 1 tsp ginger powder instead
  4. Put ginger in the water and simmer for 15 minutes
  5. You may add a teaspoon of honey or lime for flavor
  6. Strain, cool, sip and enjoy


8. Marshmallow root (Althaea officinalis)

        The marshmallow I'm referring to is a herb, not the fluffy treat. It has a long history dating back to the ancient Egypt. Back in the old days, it is used to make marshmallow. But, modern marshmallows are no longer made from the sap of marshmallow plant. It is made from gelatin instead.
        Marshmallow's leaves and roots are use as an alternative kitchen remedy for dry cough, cold, nasal congestion, sore throat, heartburn, dyspepsia, and ulcer. It has antitussive ,antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and mucilage properties. It has a viscous component which coats the throat to relieve irritation.

Marshmallow tincture: You can take 6-12 drops marshmallow tincture 3 times a day. Put it direct under your tongue for after absorption or add it to your drinking water or juice.

How to Make a Marshmallow root Tea? 
        Ingredients:
  • 1 cup (250 ml) water
  • 1 tablespoon dried marshmallow root
  • 1 teaspoon honey

       Instruction:
  1. Pour 1 cup water into a mug
  2. Add 1 tbsp dried marshmallow root
  3. Steep for 5-10 minutes
  4. Strain
  5. You may add a teaspoon of honey  for fl
  6. Enjoy!


Thursday, June 23, 2016

Home Remedies for Dysmenorrhea

Home Remedies for Dysmenorrhea / Menstrual cramps

by: Arlene Gentallan

        Is there an anxiety and dread that comes along with your monthly period? You're not alone in the battle. Dysmenorrhea is such a common problem that it afflicts 1 in every 4 women. Menstruation can become hard and frustrating when it brings about pain, but instead of resorting to medications which may have untoward side effects, why not try some of nature's best remedy?


What is Dysmenorrhea / Menstrual cramps?

        Dysmenorrhea or menstrual cramps is the cramping pain women experience 1-2 days before menstruation begins or while menstruating. Pain is usually felt at pelvis, lower abdomen, lower back, or inner thighs. Severity may vary from mild discomfort to severe pain that interferes with daily activity.

        If it's primary dysmenorrhea where there is no underlying pathological condition, pain may usually last for just a few hours but may persist for up to 1-3 days, which may be accompanied by nausea, vomiting, fatigue, diarrhea, and headache. The pain caused by primary dysmenorrhea may lessen as the woman's age advances and may completely stop once she bore her first child.

        Secondary dysmenorrhea is caused by a gynecological disorder such as endometriosis, adenomyosis, and PID. It's typical onset is during a woman's adulthood. The pain it causes usually lasts a duration of more than 3 days.


Nature's Ways to Beat Pain:


1. Heat Application

        Applying heat to your lower abdomen and pelvic area helps relax your muscle which will then ease your menstrual cramp. You can use hot compress, hot pack, or heating pad. You can also relieve menstrual cramp with a nice hot bath. Pour in a few drops of lavender oil on your bath water for a much relaxing experience.

        If in cases when you don't have a handy hot compress with you, you can use a glass or plastic bottle filled with hot water instead. Be sure to use a padding so you won;t burn yourself.



2. Lavender oil

        Lavender's clean relaxing fragrant is a good home remedy for dysmenorrhea. The result of a study by Raisi Dehkordi, Hosseini Baharanchi, and Bekhradi shows that 

"lavender inhalation was effective in alleviating dysmenorrhea symptoms, suggesting that it could be applied by midwives in a safe manner because of no side effects, simplicity and cost-effectiveness for all patients."

        Lavender oil can also be applied topically on the lower abdomen and pelvis to relieve mentrual cramps.

Note: Up yo date, there is not much research done regarding the ingestion of lavender oil. Some people experience negative side effects when taking it by mouth.

3. Chamomile tea

         A study publised on ACS's Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry shows that intake of 5 glass of German chamomile (Matricaria recutita) every day for 2 weeks results in higher urine levels of  hippurate and glycine in it's 14 participants (7 male & 7 female).

           Hippurate is a metabolite associated with antibacterial activity. This explains how chamomile tea is able to help the body's immune system fight infectious diseases like common cold. Glycine is an amino acid neurotransmitter associated with muscle relaxation, nerve inhibition and sedation. Thus, alleviating menstrual cramps.

         Chamomile's medicinal benefits has been appreciated since the ancient times however it is only just recently that we are beginning to understand it in light of science.

“This is one of a growing number of studies that provide evidence that commonly used natural products really do contain chemicals that may be of medicinal value,” says Elaine Holmes, Ph.D., chemist at Imperial College London.

4. Ginger

         Ginger is such a superfood that has a list of health benefits which includes relieving menstrual cramps. In a study by Ozgoli, Goli and Moattar publised on NLM, they concluded that "Ginger was as effective as mefenamic acid and ibuprofen in relieving pain in women with primary dysmenorrhea."

         In the said study, 150 students were divided into two groups. One groupd received "250 mg capsules of ginger rhizome powder four times a day for three days from the start of their menstrual period." While the other group "received 250 mg mefenamic acid or 400 mg ibuprofen capsules, respectively, on the same protocol." The pain relief they've obtained from either of the two management were about the same.

         Why not try a home made cup of ginger tea? It will also relieve the nausea and vomiting that frequently comes with primary dysmenorrhea.

How to Make a Ginger Tea? 


        Ingredients:
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 inch size ginger or 1 teaspoon ginger powder
  • 1 teaspoon honey or lime


       Instruction:
  1. Boil 1 cup of water
  2. Peel and finely chop a 1 inch size ginger
  3. You may also use 1 tsp ginger powder instead
  4. Put ginger in the water and simmer for 15 minutes
  5. You may add a teaspoon of honey or lime for flavor
  6. Strain, cool, sip and enjoy


5. Peppermint

        Peppermint provides a soothing cool relief from a body pains and cramps, including dysmenorhea. It also helps relieve nausea and vomiting. Here's how to use peppermint:

  • Apply 1-2 drops peppermint essential oil on your lower abdomen.
  • Put a few drops of peppermint essential oil into a cotton and inhale it.
  • Make yourself a cup peppermint tea. Ready to use tea bags are available for purchase, but you can also brew your own.

How to make peppermint tea?

        Ingredients:
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 tablespoon dried or fresh peppermint leaves
  • 1 teaspoon honey or lime
       Instruction:
  1. Put 1 cup boiling water in a mug
  2. Add 1 tbsp dried or fresh peppermint leaves
  3. Cover mug with saucer and steep for 5-10 minutes
  4. You may add a teaspoon of honey or lime for flavor
  5. Strain, cool, sip and enjoy

6. Fennel

        Fennel has antispasmodic property. There are several researches done to prove it's benefit in relieving menstrual cramps. In a study by Shabnam Omidvar, Sedighe Esmailzadeh, et al. publised on NLM, 50 virgin participants were given either 30 mg fennel extract 4 times a day or placebo from the start of their period. The result showed that fennel is effective in relieving primary dysmenorrhea.

        In another study by Namavar Namavar Jahromi, Tartifizadeh A, and Khabnadideh S. publised on NLM, comparison was made between fennel (essense of Fennel fruit with 2% concentration given 25 drops orally every 4 hours) and mefenamic acid (250mg taken orally every 6 hours) in the treatment of primary dysmenorrhea in 30 participants with moderate to severe pain. 

        The result of the study showed that "The essence of fennel can be used as a safe and effective herbal drug for primary dysmenorrhea, however, it may have a lower potency than mefenamic acid in the dosages used for this study."


How to use Fennel essential oil to relieve menstrual cramps:
  • Fennel essential oils is availble for purchase. Simple apply 1-2 drops to your lower abdomen to lessen the pain of dysmenorrhea.

How to make Fennel Tea?

        Ingredients:
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 teaspoon fennel seeds
  • 1 teaspoon honey or sugar
       Instruction:
  1. Boil 1 cup of water
  2. Add 1 tsp fennel seeds
  3. Simmer for 5-10 minutes
  4. Strain the mixture
  5. You may add a teaspoon of honey or sugar for flavor
  6. Drink and enjoy!


7. Cinnamon

        Cinnamon is not just a spice, it's also a home remedy for primary dysmenorrhea. There are lots of culinary dishes involving cinnamon but why not start with a simple tea.

How to make Cinnamon Tea using cinnamon powder?


        Ingredients:
  • 1 cup water
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon powder
  • 1 teaspoon honey or sugar

       Instruction:
  1. Pour 1 cup boiling water into a cup
  2. Add 1/4 tsp cinnamon powder
  3. Cover mug with saucer and steep for 5-10 minutes
  4. You may add a teaspoon of honey or sugar for flavor
  5. Drink and enjoy!


How to make Cinnamon Tea using cinnamon sticks?


        Ingredients:
  • 1 cup water
  • 3 pcs cinnamon stick 3 inch length
  • 1 teaspoon honey or sugar


       Instruction:
  1. Pour 1 cup of water in a pot
  2. Add 3 pcs cinnamon stick (crushed or whole)
  3. Place under medium low heat for 15 minutes (Do not boil)
  4. Steep/cool for 5-10 minutes.
  5. Strain the mixture
  6. You may add a teaspoon of honey or sugar for flavor
  7. Drink and enjoy!


How to make Cinnamon Milk Tea?


        Ingredients:
  • 1 cup milk
  • 2 pcs cinnamon stick or 1 teaspoon cinnamon powder
  • 1 teaspoon honey or sugar


       Instruction:
  1. Pour 1 cup boiling milk into a mug
  2. Add 2 pcs cinnamon stick or 1 teaspoon cinnamon powder
  3. Cover mug with saucer and steep for 5-10 minutes
  4. You may add a teaspoon of honey or sugar for flavor
  5. Drink and enjoy!


8. Basil


        Basil is a natural pain killer. It can be taken as a tea. You can also roll about 10 pieces fresh basil leaves and chew it to obtain relief from dysmenorrhea. There have been reports that daily consumption of basil can help prevent menstrual cramps.

How to make Basil Tea?

        Ingredients:

  • 1 cup water
  • 2 tablespoon fresh basil leaves or 1 tablesppon dried leaves
  • 1 teaspoon honey or sugar
       Instruction:

  1. Pour 1 cup boiling water into a mug
  2. Add 2 tbsp fresh or 1 tbsp dried basil leaves
  3. Cover mug with saucer and steep for 5-10 minutes
  4. You may add a teaspoon of honey or sugar for flavor
  5. Drink and enjoy!

9. Exercise

       Time and again, exercise has been shown to be an indispensable when it comes to combating health issues. Exercise can help ease your menstrual cramps because it triggers production of endorphins which is the body's natural pain killers.


        In a study by Yang and Kim published on the United States National Library of Medicine, it shows that a yoga program may help alleviate menstrual cramps.


Home Remedies for Dysmenorrhea

Home Remedies for Dysmenorrhea / Menstrual cramps

by: Arlene Gentallan

        Is there an anxiety and dread that comes along with your monthly period? You're not alone in the battle. Dysmenorrhea is such a common problem that it afflicts 1 in every 4 women. Menstruation can become hard and frustrating when it brings about pain, but instead of resorting to medications which may have untoward side effects, why not try some of nature's best remedy?


What is Dysmenorrhea / Menstrual cramps?

        Dysmenorrhea or menstrual cramps is the cramping pain women experience 1-2 days before menstruation begins or while menstruating. Pain is usually felt at pelvis, lower abdomen, lower back, or inner thighs. Severity may vary from mild discomfort to severe pain that interferes with daily activity.

        If it's primary dysmenorrhea where there is no underlying pathological condition, pain may usually last for just a few hours but may persist for up to 1-3 days, which may be accompanied by nausea, vomiting, fatigue, diarrhea, and headache. The pain caused by primary dysmenorrhea may lessen as the woman's age advances and may completely stop once she bore her first child.

        Secondary dysmenorrhea is caused by a gynecological disorder such as endometriosis, adenomyosis, and PID. It's typical onset is during a woman's adulthood. The pain it causes usually lasts a duration of more than 3 days.


Nature's Ways to Beat Pain:


1. Heat Application

        Applying heat to your lower abdomen and pelvic area helps relax your muscle which will then ease your menstrual cramp. You can use hot compress, hot pack, or heating pad. You can also relieve menstrual cramp with a nice hot bath. Pour in a few drops of lavender oil on your bath water for a much relaxing experience.

        If in cases when you don't have a handy hot compress with you, you can use a glass or plastic bottle filled with hot water instead. Be sure to use a padding so you won;t burn yourself.



2. Lavender oil

        Lavender's clean relaxing fragrant is a good home remedy for dysmenorrhea. The result of a study by Raisi Dehkordi, Hosseini Baharanchi, and Bekhradi shows that 

"lavender inhalation was effective in alleviating dysmenorrhea symptoms, suggesting that it could be applied by midwives in a safe manner because of no side effects, simplicity and cost-effectiveness for all patients."

        Lavender oil can also be applied topically on the lower abdomen and pelvis to relieve mentrual cramps.

Note: Up yo date, there is not much research done regarding the ingestion of lavender oil. Some people experience negative side effects when taking it by mouth.

3. Chamomile tea

         A study publised on ACS's Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry shows that intake of 5 glass of German chamomile (Matricaria recutita) every day for 2 weeks results in higher urine levels of  hippurate and glycine in it's 14 participants (7 male & 7 female).

           Hippurate is a metabolite associated with antibacterial activity. This explains how chamomile tea is able to help the body's immune system fight infectious diseases like common cold. Glycine is an amino acid neurotransmitter associated with muscle relaxation, nerve inhibition and sedation. Thus, alleviating menstrual cramps.

         Chamomile's medicinal benefits has been appreciated since the ancient times however it is only just recently that we are beginning to understand it in light of science.

“This is one of a growing number of studies that provide evidence that commonly used natural products really do contain chemicals that may be of medicinal value,” says Elaine Holmes, Ph.D., chemist at Imperial College London.

4. Ginger

         Ginger is such a superfood that has a list of health benefits which includes relieving menstrual cramps. In a study by Ozgoli, Goli and Moattar publised on NLM, they concluded that "Ginger was as effective as mefenamic acid and ibuprofen in relieving pain in women with primary dysmenorrhea."

         In the said study, 150 students were divided into two groups. One groupd received "250 mg capsules of ginger rhizome powder four times a day for three days from the start of their menstrual period." While the other group "received 250 mg mefenamic acid or 400 mg ibuprofen capsules, respectively, on the same protocol." The pain relief they've obtained from either of the two management were about the same.

         Why not try a home made cup of ginger tea? It will also relieve the nausea and vomiting that frequently comes with primary dysmenorrhea.

How to Make a Ginger Tea? 


        Ingredients:
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 inch size ginger or 1 teaspoon ginger powder
  • 1 teaspoon honey or lime


       Instruction:
  1. Boil 1 cup of water
  2. Peel and finely chop a 1 inch size ginger
  3. You may also use 1 tsp ginger powder instead
  4. Put ginger in the water and simmer for 15 minutes
  5. You may add a teaspoon of honey or lime for flavor
  6. Strain, cool, sip and enjoy


5. Peppermint

        Peppermint provides a soothing cool relief from a body pains and cramps, including dysmenorhea. It also helps relieve nausea and vomiting. Here's how to use peppermint:

  • Apply 1-2 drops peppermint essential oil on your lower abdomen.
  • Put a few drops of peppermint essential oil into a cotton and inhale it.
  • Make yourself a cup peppermint tea. Ready to use tea bags are available for purchase, but you can also brew your own.

How to make peppermint tea?

        Ingredients:
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 tablespoon dried or fresh peppermint leaves
  • 1 teaspoon honey or lime
       Instruction:
  1. Put 1 cup boiling water in a mug
  2. Add 1 tbsp dried or fresh peppermint leaves
  3. Cover mug with saucer and steep for 5-10 minutes
  4. You may add a teaspoon of honey or lime for flavor
  5. Strain, cool, sip and enjoy

6. Fennel

        Fennel has antispasmodic property. There are several researches done to prove it's benefit in relieving menstrual cramps. In a study by Shabnam Omidvar, Sedighe Esmailzadeh, et al. publised on NLM, 50 virgin participants were given either 30 mg fennel extract 4 times a day or placebo from the start of their period. The result showed that fennel is effective in relieving primary dysmenorrhea.

        In another study by Namavar Namavar Jahromi, Tartifizadeh A, and Khabnadideh S. publised on NLM, comparison was made between fennel (essense of Fennel fruit with 2% concentration given 25 drops orally every 4 hours) and mefenamic acid (250mg taken orally every 6 hours) in the treatment of primary dysmenorrhea in 30 participants with moderate to severe pain. 

        The result of the study showed that "The essence of fennel can be used as a safe and effective herbal drug for primary dysmenorrhea, however, it may have a lower potency than mefenamic acid in the dosages used for this study."


How to use Fennel essential oil to relieve menstrual cramps:
  • Fennel essential oils is availble for purchase. Simple apply 1-2 drops to your lower abdomen to lessen the pain of dysmenorrhea.

How to make Fennel Tea?

        Ingredients:
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 teaspoon fennel seeds
  • 1 teaspoon honey or sugar
       Instruction:
  1. Boil 1 cup of water
  2. Add 1 tsp fennel seeds
  3. Simmer for 5-10 minutes
  4. Strain the mixture
  5. You may add a teaspoon of honey or sugar for flavor
  6. Drink and enjoy!


7. Cinnamon

        Cinnamon is not just a spice, it's also a home remedy for primary dysmenorrhea. There are lots of culinary dishes involving cinnamon but why not start with a simple tea.

How to make Cinnamon Tea using cinnamon powder?


        Ingredients:
  • 1 cup water
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon powder
  • 1 teaspoon honey or sugar

       Instruction:
  1. Pour 1 cup boiling water into a cup
  2. Add 1/4 tsp cinnamon powder
  3. Cover mug with saucer and steep for 5-10 minutes
  4. You may add a teaspoon of honey or sugar for flavor
  5. Drink and enjoy!


How to make Cinnamon Tea using cinnamon sticks?


        Ingredients:
  • 1 cup water
  • 3 pcs cinnamon stick 3 inch length
  • 1 teaspoon honey or sugar


       Instruction:
  1. Pour 1 cup of water in a pot
  2. Add 3 pcs cinnamon stick (crushed or whole)
  3. Place under medium low heat for 15 minutes (Do not boil)
  4. Steep/cool for 5-10 minutes.
  5. Strain the mixture
  6. You may add a teaspoon of honey or sugar for flavor
  7. Drink and enjoy!


How to make Cinnamon Milk Tea?


        Ingredients:
  • 1 cup milk
  • 2 pcs cinnamon stick or 1 teaspoon cinnamon powder
  • 1 teaspoon honey or sugar


       Instruction:
  1. Pour 1 cup boiling milk into a mug
  2. Add 2 pcs cinnamon stick or 1 teaspoon cinnamon powder
  3. Cover mug with saucer and steep for 5-10 minutes
  4. You may add a teaspoon of honey or sugar for flavor
  5. Drink and enjoy!


8. Basil


        Basil is a natural pain killer. It can be taken as a tea. You can also roll about 10 pieces fresh basil leaves and chew it to obtain relief from dysmenorrhea. There have been reports that daily consumption of basil can help prevent menstrual cramps.

How to make Basil Tea?

        Ingredients:

  • 1 cup water
  • 2 tablespoon fresh basil leaves or 1 tablesppon dried leaves
  • 1 teaspoon honey or sugar
       Instruction:

  1. Pour 1 cup boiling water into a mug
  2. Add 2 tbsp fresh or 1 tbsp dried basil leaves
  3. Cover mug with saucer and steep for 5-10 minutes
  4. You may add a teaspoon of honey or sugar for flavor
  5. Drink and enjoy!

9. Exercise

       Time and again, exercise has been shown to be an indispensable when it comes to combating health issues. Exercise can help ease your menstrual cramps because it triggers production of endorphins which is the body's natural pain killers.


        In a study by Yang and Kim published on the United States National Library of Medicine, it shows that a yoga program may help alleviate menstrual cramps.